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20130201
20130209
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
's that revenue is absolutely not an option. >> this quest to continually to raise taxes is not going anywhere. we've already done that. >> americans do not support sacrificing real spending cuts for more tax hikes. >> this is the wrong time for sequestration to take place. we should be able to sit down together and resolve this without again asking the american people to have their taxes increased. >> i want to bring in roll call cheryl and washington bureau chief ryan grim. good morning. >> good morning. >> the president says let's replace this with taxes and alternate cuts. republicans say cuts but no taxes. is it clear, ryan, who has the upper hand here? >> it's not entirely clear. republicans certainly feel like they have the upper hand here, much more so than the fiscal cliff. around the fiscal cliff, if nothing happened, taxes went up and democrats had a clear advantage. this time if nothing happens, spending cuts go into effects so republicans sort of think they have an advantage. but what is getting cut? the pentagon is taking the brunt of these cuts. certainly the commander in chief does
that they should at least pass a smaller package of spending cuts and tax reforms that would delay the economically damaging effects of the sequester for a few more months until congress finds a way to replace these cuts with a smarter solution. >> immediately, republicans said no. politico's headline reads, it's already d.o.a. on the hill. republicans reject this right away because they see tax reforms as a tax increase. here's what kelly ayacht said this morning. >> his first response to everything is new taxes. he got $600 billion in new revenue, where were the spending cuts? now again he wants to raise taxes. i think it's time for us to cut spending. >> and those comments followed pat toomey, who said sorry, president obama, no more tax increases. mitch mcconnell said the government will not support more tax hikes in place of the meaningful spending reductions. so what's behind the president talking about this yesterday? >> it's no surprise. of course they're going to say it's d.o.a. they always say it's d.o.a. >> but is it d.o.a.? >> i'm not sure it is. i do think there is renewed pressure on
that it's more important not to give more ground on taxes than it is to create certainty. so i think everyone agrees that uncertainty is a problem. i think basically everybody agrees that uncertainty is freezing businesses, a lot of businesses are sitting on huge amounts of cash, huge amounts of cash. that they're not acting on. but the problem is, that republicans just don't want to budge from their position on taxes, and i think the president, my own analysis, had been more flexible. but they would say the president cares more about protecting entitlements fully. uncertainty is a problem but not a bigger problem than the priorities of the republicans in particular. and also the democrats' entitlements. so i don't think we get a deal in the near future. >> well, that's not encouraging. and you've got these numbers, and jay carney asked to explain yesterday about the president's jobs council and said it had this two-year charter and expired and they'll continue to reach out to business leaders in had other ways. but karen, is this bad timing? >> yeah, i think it just gives the -- the
of switch gears on messaging. he is expected to tout new education initiatives, ways to simplify the tax code, kush health care costs, immigration reform. ron fournier with the "national journal," jonathan, asked this question -- "with a democratic tide threatening to crush the dpop, is it enough to just tweak talking points?" what do you say to that question? >> i think there's a tendency among policy maker, politicians who are in the legislative chamber all day, to be using this policy. they talk about the fiscal cliff, about entitlement reform, about debalancing the budget. but it's devoid of any value to the average voter. so fournier may have a point there, but i think it's critical for republicans to be talking about the values behind these policies, that we're always promoting. fiscal responsibility, why are we doing that? because that's a path to prosperity. i think that's a critical thing that eric cantor is doing today and i applaud him for doing it. >> that is what he does seem to be wanting to talk about, connecting the dots. and steve, he isn't just talking about -- you know
that taxes are appropriately paid. we know that border security has to be an element of it as well, and the dream act has to be a part of it. with so many young people doing the right thing, in college, being leaders of the future, entering the military, in phoenix that's our leaders of the future. we want to support those leaders, so the dream act is incredibly important to the future of my city. >> last month i know you attended the 21st century border initiative meeting. last week you met with president obama before his speech on immigration in las vegas. i'm curious, what did you say to him and what do you make of his proposals and his approach? >> well, i told the president that i was proud of him for making this a priority, that now is the time. his message to me was to keep supporting our two senators from arizona, senator mccain and flake who are on the front lines of this issue. we know this can only be done in a bipartisan way, and that's why i'm so excited to hear leaders of both parties heading to the right direction, but we can't delay. we can't allow the minor things
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)